Run-on Sentences

Run-on Sentences

Lila enjoyed the bouquet of tulips John gave her on prom night however she prefers roses.

Lila enjoyed the bouquet of tulips John gave her on prom night; however, she prefers roses.

Run-on sentences, also known as fused sentences, occur when two complete sentences are squashed together without using a coordinating conjunction or proper punctuation, such as a period or a semicolon. Run-on sentences can be short or long. A long sentence isn’t necessarily a run-on sentence.

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To avoid run-on sentences, see if there is more than one idea communicated by two or more independent clauses. In our examples, there are two complete sentences:

Lily enjoyed the bouquet of tulips John gave her on prom night.

She prefers roses.

Both sentences are complete ideas by themselves; therefore, use a semicolon or a period to indicate that they are separate independent clauses.

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