Anymore vs. Any More

Anymore vs. Any More

Any more

Any more (two words) refers to quantities.

Are there any more cookies?

You already ate seven; you don’t need any more!

Anymore

Anymore (one word) refers to time. It means “at present,” “still,” or “any longer.”

Why doesn’t Mom bake cookies anymore?

She doesn’t bake cookies anymore because you always eat them all and don’t leave any for her!

In certain dialects, some speakers use anymore as a synonym of nowadays.

Cookies are almost impossible to come by around here anymore.

However, this usage is not considered acceptable in formal writing. In fact, it’s a fairly rare usage, so you may want to remove it from your writing altogether unless you’re writing for a very specific audience.

Weekly Grammar Tips
Weekly Grammar Tips
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Comments
  • Mjhmjh

    The rule given here is, however, American usage. In British English, ‘any more’ is used to mean ‘any longer’. (Reference: ‘The Chambers Dictionary’ 2014 edition.)

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