"Preposition + when/who/where/what etc" + "Preposition + interrogative sentences"

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 Hello, I have 2 kinds of quick questions about english, esp, spoken english.
Are those below sentences and answers correct regarding spoken english?
Please, pick better ones if there're two similar options or you may change/correct them to make them sound better.

 

*A listner or speaker may say "Preposition + when? who? where? etc" or vice versa.
When it comes like that, which one sounds better?

1.
A: Can you move this chair?
B: Where to? / To where?
A: To room 301.

 

2.
A: I made a cake!
B: For who? / Who for?

 

3.
A: I gotta go..
B: What for? / For what? (I remember someone in an american movie said "What for?")

 


*Whenever I ask something I usually end a sentence with a preposition needed. Which way do native speakers usually go for more often? Below is just examples I would say.
Is there any special case when I should start with a preposition?

 

1. By when do I have to hand in this paper?
When do I have to hand in this paper by?

 

2. How long are you gonna stay here for?
For how long are you gonna stay here?
(I guess "how long" already contains the meaning of "for" so i believe i can omit "for", right?)

 

3. When do I need to stay here until?
Until when do I need to stay here?

 

4. Who was it written/done/"other verbs" by?
By who was it written/done/"other verbs"?

 

I know we usually say "Who did you go with?" but not say "With who did you go?"

Actually to me, a non-native English speaker from an East Asian country, the first way sounds better as well as the second way does too. I guess it depends on sentences?
I'm not so sure.. please, help me..

 

Thanks in advance..

edited Feb 16 at 09:24 Tong Ryung Kim New member

2 answers


1

The old 'rule that you should never end a sentence with a preposition was always artificial. Few native speakers worry about in now in speaking, though some follow it in formal writing.

 

Now let;s look at your mini-dialogues.


A: Can you move this chair?
B: Where to? / To where?

 

Both are fine and natural. The first is more common.

A: I made a cake!
B: For who? / Who for?

 

Both are acceptable. Traditionalists prefer to use whom' after a preposition; they would therefore say For whom? rather than For who? However, this is not natural if the preposition goes to the end -  nobody would say Whom for?

A: I gotta go..
B: What for? / For what?

 

Both are acceptable. The first is more common. Remember that te correct form is I've got to. This may be produced by some speakers as gotta informally, but it should not appear in writing except in the most informal of emails, texts and chatrooms.

 

By when do I have to hand in this paper?
When do I have to hand in this paper by?

 

Both are acceptable.  TThe first is more formal, the second  more comon

 


2. How long are you gonna stay here for?
For how long are you gonna stay here?

 

Both are acceptable in informal speech. The first is more common. It is possible to omit for. Remember that te correct form is going to. This may be produced by some speakers as gonna informally, but it should not appear in writing except in the most informal of emails, texts and chatrooms.


 When do I need to stay here until?
Until when do I need to stay here?

 

Both are possible.

Who was it written/done/"other verbs" by?
By who was it written/done/"other verbs"?

 

Both are possible. As I said above, Traditionalists prefer to use whom after a preposition; they would therefore say By whom? rather than By who?. However, this is not natural if the preposition goes to the end -  nobody would say Whom by?  

link answered Feb 16 at 10:42 Jed Grammarly Fellow

wow, I appreciate your answer in detail. Thank you so much..! Yes, my country, korea, prefers American english and either do I. I'll remember your advice above. Thanks!

Tong Ryung KimFeb 22 at 07:55

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Children cannot open these bottles easily

link comment answered Feb 16 at 10:07 Adnan New member

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