under what circumstances would one use the phrase "relate to" versus "relate with"

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Are there times when either phrase ("relate to" or "relate with") would apply and what are the grammar guidelines?

asked Sep 09 '12 at 22:10 christine tandon New member

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You should use "relate with" if you are referring to something - an instrument or a tool - or somehow - an adverb - used in the process of relating. That is, only when using the word "relate" in its first meaning: to narrate. As in:

 

Susan's story was related with gusto.

 

If you mean any of relate's other meanings, such as a relationship ("We pretended we weren't related to uncle Jimmy."), to indicate a connection ("The head office believes creativity is directly related to production."), or to sympathise ("The mob related to the speaker's anti-establishment ideas.") always use "to."

link answered Sep 14 '12 at 02:50 mysticete Contributor

slightly odd that I have just posted this and the server believes it to have been written 23 hours ago.

mysticeteSep 14 '12 at 02:51

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