adverb/adjective before a noun?

1

Gauchely gait. I write this term attempting to use an alliteration for a loud/ungraceful/obnoxious walk/pace/creep etc... Its use makes sense to me, but I am confused about the details.

See example:

We went through some ideas and planned queues for me to either make a scornful scream, a mourning moan, or even, perhaps, a gauchely gait.
asked Apr 24 '14 at 04:38 Jake Allison New member

1 answer


2

The term "gauchely gait" works seeing that it is a adverb complimenting a noun, but the comma (,) is not used right unless it is someone talking and then your trying for a sort of stutter step to the speech in which case it should be in quotation marks ( " ).  The problem I see is the "mourning moan" it should be (a moan of mourning) or (a mournful moan).

Example 1: We went through some ideas and planned queues for me to either make a scornful scream, a mournful moan, or even perhaps a gauchely gait.

Example 2: The man said, "We went through some ideas and planned queues for me to either make a scornful scream, a mournful moan, or even, perhaps, a gauchely gait?"   This would also make it a form of question or a Rhetorical question at the end.

Hope this helps.

link answered Apr 24 '14 at 06:48 allen New member

I would agree with you strongly on the "mournful" part. It really wanted me to change it though. I later figured out how to override the suggestion. But I think the comma placement you suggested is very helpful. I'm glad gauchely gait works. It seemed ok to me but grammarly was having a shit fit over it. Thanks for the help!

Jake AllisonJun 04 '14 at 04:03

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