Difference between object of a transitive verb and the complement of an intransitive verb

0

My students are having difficulty telling the difference between the object of a transitive verb and the complement of an intransitive verb.

 

For example,

 

"He became a master of martial arts."

 

Half of the students said that "master of martial arts" would have to be the object and that became would be transitive, since the verb "to become" is being done to "master of martial arts."

 

Others said that became would act like "come" and would not ever be able to be transitive, as it is a state of being verb. And so "master of martial arts" would have to be the complement.

 

Who is correct?

asked Sep 20 '13 at 21:53 sali New member

1 answer


0

I am learning about this while studying another language.  

Become can be either transitive or intransitive, depending upon situation. 

Example of it's use as a transitive: as a synonym of 'to suit' - eg:

"The dress becomes her"

 

Example of it's use as an intransitive: as a synonym of 'develop' or 'evolve' - eg.

"The caterpillar became a butterfly".

 

In the sentence above - "He became a master of martial arts." the verb is being used in the intransitive sense, and 'master of martial arts' is the complement.

 

The way I remember it is that when the verb is about what is happening to the subject, it tends to be intransitive - it's not transferring the action to something or someone else.

link comment edited Aug 28 at 11:21 Bob New member

Your answer


Write at least 20 characters

Have a question about English grammar, style or vocabulary use? Ask now to get help from Grammarly experts for FREE.