what ever vs whatever

1

When do you use these words?

See example:

They were trying hard to hear whatever words were being spoken.
asked Nov 08 '11 at 05:05 char taylor New member

4 answers


1

Now, the phrase “what ever” is used to express a question about a period of time.

Example:
What ever became of that old drilling rig Exxon bought for training purposes?

If the sentence still makes sense without the word “ever,” you can usually use the two separate words “what ever.”

 

Source: https://oilpatchwriting.wordpress.com/2011/03/03/whatever-vs-what-ever/

link comment answered Dec 03 '15 at 23:05 Jacqueline Kremer New member
0

"Whatever" is really the only word you can use in regards to the question.  "What ever" just doesn't exist, and if you see it, it's wrong.

link answered Nov 08 '11 at 20:25 Scott Martin Contributor

"What ever" is actually two separate words compared to "whatever," and there's quite of a difference. Just like with "everyday" and "every day." Not many people know the difference.

DaredevilFeb 25 at 03:53

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0

The phrase “what ever” is used to express a question about a period of time.

 

Example:
What ever became of that old drilling rig Exxon bought for training purposes?

 

If the sentence still makes sense without the word “ever,” you can usually use the two separate words “what ever.”

 

Source: https://oilpatchwriting.wordpress.com/2011/03/03/whatever-vs-what-ever/

link comment answered Dec 03 '15 at 23:06 Jacqueline Kremer New member
0

Whatever has a very specfic intent when used correctly.  It is meant to convey a lack of restriction in what ever it refers to, as in:

 

Do whatever it takes to defeat Donald Trump.

link comment answered Jul 21 at 20:00 Thomas Docheri New member

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