the usage of welcome as opposed to welcomed.

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which sentence is correct in the use of welcome or welcomed?

Thank you john and you are most welcomed. OR..... Thank you John and you are most welcome.

See example:

You are most welcomed.
asked May 03 '13 at 18:37 Walshin Investigations New member

5 answers


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 "You are welcomed" is correct because this is how the PASSIVE voice is used in the English Language.

Examples of ACTIVE VOICE:
This bores you. (or: I bore you.)
I accept you.
I love you.
I trust you.
I excite you.
I welcome you.

EXAMPLES OF PASSIVE VOICE:
You are bored. (not "You are bore")
You are accepted. (not "You are accept")
You are loved. (not "You are love")
You are trusted. (not "You are trust")
You are excited. (not "You are excite")
You are welcomed. (not "You are welcome")

Always remember the distinction between ACTIVE VOICE and PASSIVE VOICE: I welcome you, and you are welcomed (by me)

The words: bored, accepted, trusted, loved, welcomed are also examples of participial adjectives and their roles as adjectives can also be understood in the following examples.

Used as an adjective, we would have:
The bored guest.
The accepted guest
The loved guest (or the beloved guest)
The excited guest
The welcomed guest.

Unfortunately we hear it so often wrongly expressed as "You are welcome ..." that we have grown used to the error and now find it universally accepted, even though it is an incorrect usage of the Passive Voice. (and by the way, the -d ending in these cases are not an expression of past tense at all.)

You may wish to explore more about "the passive voice" in English

Source(s): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_passive_voice

link answered Nov 05 '15 at 00:24 k8 New member

Oxford Dictionaries does not agree with you: adjective1(Of a guest or new arrival) gladly received: I’m pleased to see you, lad—you’re welcomeMore example sentences Synonyms2Very pleasing because much needed or desired: after your walk, the tea room serves a welcome cuppa.'Accepted', 'loved' etc. are participial adjectives (as you say); as a matter of fact the -d ending is the expression of the PAST participle.

MitziJun 24 at 23:19

Oxford Dictionaries does not agree with you: adjective1(Of a guest or new arrival) gladly received: I’m pleased to see you, lad—you’re welcomeMore example sentences Synonyms2Very pleasing because much needed or desired: after your walk, the tea room serves a welcome cuppa.'Accepted', 'loved' etc. are participial adjectives (as you say); as a matter of fact the -d ending is the expression of the PAST participle.

MitziJun 24 at 23:25

Oxford Dictionaries does not agree with you: adjective1(Of a guest or new arrival) gladly received: I’m pleased to see you, lad—you’re welcomeMore example sentences Synonyms2Very pleasing because much needed or desired: after your walk, the tea room serves a welcome cuppa.'Accepted', 'loved' etc. are participial adjectives (as you say); as a matter of fact the -d ending is the expression of the PAST participle.

MitziJun 24 at 23:25

Oxford Dictionaries does not agree with you: adjective1(Of a guest or new arrival) gladly received: I’m pleased to see you, lad—you’re welcomeMore example sentences Synonyms2Very pleasing because much needed or desired: after your walk, the tea room serves a welcome cuppa.'Accepted', 'loved' etc. are participial adjectives (as you say); as a matter of fact the -d ending is the expression of the PAST participle.

MitziJun 24 at 23:25

Oxford Dictionaries does not agree with you: adjective1(Of a guest or new arrival) gladly received: I’m pleased to see you, lad—you’re welcomeMore example sentences Synonyms2Very pleasing because much needed or desired: after your walk, the tea room serves a welcome cuppa.'Accepted', 'loved' etc. are participial adjectives (as you say); as a matter of fact the -d ending is the expression of the PAST participle.

MitziJun 24 at 23:26

Sorry about the repeated comment: when I pressed 'add comment' it gave 'error' so I tried again, with the same result. After a couple of minutes the five comments appeared...

MitziJun 24 at 23:32

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Thank you. Somebody at the best essay writing company asked about the use of welcome and welcomed. After sharing something together and somebody says "Thank you", do you say "You are welcome" or "You are welcomed"? 

According to me, we should answer "You are welcomed". 

link comment edited Jan 31 at 20:15 Grace New member
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The correct answer is:  Thank you, John, and you are most welcome."  NOT welcomed.

'is welcomed'  or 'are welcomed' would have to be followed by an infinitive.

For example,  "Thank you, John, and you are most welcomed to come back next week."

link answered May 02 at 23:49 Lj Thomas New member

OED, again: [predicative, with infinitive] Allowed or invited to do a specified thing: 'we arrange a framework of activities which you are welcome to join'.

MitziJun 24 at 23:36

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Both are conventional, standard English. To be welcome is an adjective just like to be welcomed is a transitive verb in the passive voice. A good example is to be open and to be opened. One would say "the store is open" but not "the store is opened" (for example, "by the man"). At the same time, one would say "the store is opened by the man every day," but not "the store is open by the man everyday." Because the adjective welcome takes the same form as the verb welcome, it can be confusing to distinguish between the two in certain contexts. "You are welcome" is conventional, standard English because in this case, welcome is an adjective. "We're always welcomed into his home with open arms and warm smiles" is correct because welcomed is in the passive voice. Without enough context, however, it can be unclear as to which should be used. As well, because of the sense of welcome, such can sometimes seem confusing. In your example, you should have written "you are most welcome" because welcome is the adjective. You could change it with other adjectives but not with other passive verbs. That is, "You are most happy", "you are most sad", "you are so very drunk", "you are most delectable". If you change the alleged verb, however, you see that such makes no sense. "You are most worked", "you are most walked", "you are most won", "you are most been", "you are most sung", "you are most done". It's not just a question of the sense of the verb, it's also the syntax, since most as a particle is used in superlative phrases and not verbal phrases. We never say, "I most walk" or "I walk most" but "you are the most interesting," "the most red" etc. You are most welcome :) Hopefully you are most thankful, but not most thanked. :)

link answered Jun 11 at 21:40 Justin New member

I agree with all the rest but can't quite understand the last bit: surely 'the most thanked' is correct?

MitziJun 24 at 23:42

You mean you agree with everything except the last part (all the rest proceeds from something, it doesn't introduce something. The adjective correct is a hard one to explain sometimes but what you mean is "standard." At any rate, instead of nitpicking, let me answer your question.

The most thanked can be correct in a given context, yes. "He is the most thanked person in the room." That however is a comparative structure whose superlative is implicit insofar as "out of all the other thanked people in the room, he is the most thanked." Here, "thanked" means he received the most thanks or gratitude. In the original sentence, however, "the most thankful" means that the person to whom I was speaking has the most gratitude for me, since I explained the answer. If I wanted to say that the person received the most support or gratitude from others, then I would have said "the most thankful."

Hopefully you are the most thankful (hopefully you have the most gratitude after having read my answer)
Hopefully you are the most thanked (hopefully you get the most amount of respect, gratitude, etc, for having answered erroneously)...

You should be able to see why the second possibility wouldn't make much sense. ;-)

JustinJun 25 at 09:50

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Do adjectives change form based on its syntactic position?In the example:i. A welcome Guest *WRONG*ii. A welcomed Guest *CORRECT*...the word 'welcomed' in the phrase in (ii) is grammatically and functionally an adjective. You are 'welcome' will be correct only if the word 'welcome' changes form based on its syntactic positions.

link comment answered Aug 09 at 12:53 Adesoro Emmanuel New member

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