showing articles for: Punctuation

For Team Members at Automated Proofreading Company, Email Presents a Major Challenge*

by • February 07, 2014
Reddit Response 1

San Francisco, Calif. – Most consumer Internet startups focus on gaining funding, accessing top talent, or providing Google-esque perks, but a Bay Area automated proofreading company is navigating a different set of issues. “I am terrified to send emails,” said a team member at Grammarly.com. “Because I work… MORE →

The Importance of Proofreading Your Résumé

by • December 05, 2013

Did you know that recruiters only spend an average of six seconds reviewing your résumé? You have a very small window in which to wow them, and in this competitive job market, even the smallest mistake can be enough to knock you out of the running. There are three main aspects of proofreading: spelling, grammar, and consistency. We’ll look at each of those below, but first, some sobering statistics about how many errors we found in a sampling of résumés. Grammarly recently conducted an audit of 50 active résumés on Indeed.com,… MORE →

Are You a Word Nerd?

by • November 05, 2013

Grammar is cool now (it’s still cool, right?) so it’s okay to wave your red pen in the air like you just don’t care. Take the quiz below and find out just how much of a word nerd you really are. Give yourself a point for each statement you agree with. You correct the lyrics to pop songs as you sing along. It’s the “one who got away,” Katy Perry. The “ten items or less” sign at the grocery store still sends you into a rage after all these years. You… MORE →

Mistake of the Month: Missing Commas

by • October 01, 2013

There are two types of writers in this world: those who use too many commas and those who use too few. While unnecessary commas can turn straightforward sentences into twisting labyrinths of syntactical confusion, missing a critical comma can change the entire meaning of your sentence. Consider the headline from the now-infamous Rachael Ray cover of Tails magazine: “Rachael Ray finds inspiration in cooking her family and her dog.” While the line breaks of the original cover make it apparent what the editors meant to say, the lack of commas between… MORE →