Meet Kimberly Joki!

by • December 10, 2013

Social Media and Community Manager, Grammarly.com

Grammarly, team, social mediaHow long have you worked at Grammarly?

I started at Grammarly in December 2010.

What is the best thing about working at Grammarly?

It’s a lot of little things and one big thing—the people. The little things include birthday celebrations, unlimited coffee, Friday pizza parties, the Grammarly Band, some space for exercise—the list could go on and on.

The biggest thing I love about Grammarly, though (and what I have really enjoyed from the beginning) are the interesting, talented, and supportive team members. Even as the company has grown, there remains a sense of “family” in the team. It’s something Grammarly aims to protect and maintain as the company grows. I like that (especially because, living in Kyiv, I am far away from my Michigan roots).

What is your favorite memory related to working at Grammarly?

I have several. It’s tough to choose between spontaneous Bachata lessons during break time, a thousand great conversations with co-workers, or group acapella singing at the company offsite in Tbilisi.

Personally, I felt really special and loved the support of the team for my birthday this year. I organized a picnic and invited the team. I figured only the people I was closest to would come, but actually several people came. They brought yummy food, lots of balloons (we’re talking about the bunch of balloons from Up), and gifts. It was unexpected. We had a great time hanging out.

What is your favorite word, and why?

“Hello.”

It is non-threatening, open, and the start to so many great conversations and relationships. People should greet each other more often. It makes the world a better place.

What is the last book you read? Would you recommend it?

I like to read all kinds of books. After a long bout of non-fiction, I recently picked up a fiction book—Mongoliad, Book One (The Foreworld Saga) by Neal Stephenson. It was my first piece of historical fiction set in the Middle Ages. The storyline is slow, but I really liked that it was set in Eastern Europe, and I had been to many of the places mentioned in the book. I got so excited when the knights entered Kyiv through the Golden Gate. I thought, “Cool! I know exactly where that is, just down the street!”

If you are looking for something light and easy, to break up heavier reading, give it a try.

Which historical figure would you like to have dinner with?

This is a toss up between Nikola Tesla and Carl Sagan. If you know who these men are, you will understand why.

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