Logical Punctuation (Infographic)

by • June 28, 2013

Guest post by Jocelyn Blore

While grammarians may bemoan the rise of social media and rampant texting for the devolution of the written word, there are battles being fought from within communities of writing Luddites as well. Would you listen to the Linguistic Society of America, or the Associated Press? The Guardian Style Guide, or the Chicago Manual of Style? These prestigious entities hold differing opinions on a hot topic in writing: Enter logical punctuation.

What exactly is the issue here? Logical punctuation is allowing the meaning and structure of a sentence to determine the placement of a comma or period rather than established conventions. You may have noticed that most people within the U.S., long-time advocates of standard punctuation, are in the practice of embracing commas and periods within quotation marks even when they’re not part of the quoted material. For example, using standard punctuation I would write:

Some may wonder why logical punctuation is called “logical.”

And with logical punctuation:

I’m an unabashed advocate for logical punctuation; I wouldn’t be quick to adopt a punctuation practice that wasn’t “logical”.

Take a look at the infographic below for further examples of a subject that’s generated over 160 printed pages on Wikipedia, and discover who’s using the “standard” versus the “logic”.

Infographic outlining logical punctuation practices.

Jocelyn Blore is a left-handed lover of Thai food and problem-solving. When she’s not juggling a soccer ball in parks around San Francisco, she writes for OnlineDegrees.com and Schools.com.

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