"I like to go shopping at a department store."

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 "I like to go shopping at a department store."

 

Why can we not use to in place of at in the sentence? Or it is possible but different in meaning? Thank you so much as always for great help and time.

edited Nov 18 '12 at 06:16 Hans Contributor

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Rahul may be confusing the issue. In American usage, one would not use "to" in this sentence.

 

No -- "I like to go shopping to a department store."

Yes -- "I like to go shopping at a department store."

Also yes -- "I like to go shopping in a department store." In American usage, one would use either "at" or "in." The difference in meaning is subtle, but has nothing to do with the reason we go shopping there. "At" expresses the location where we shop (especially relative to a present location). "In" is equivalent to saying "inside."

link answered Nov 18 '12 at 12:37 Jeff Pribyl Grammarly Fellow

Thank you so much again and then can we say "at / in a department store" modifies "go shopping" or just "shopping"? I hope to make it clear.

HansNov 19 '12 at 01:44

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