"New <noun>" = "<noun> of new"?

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Good evening,

 

My question is the following:

 

 

Is "New <noun to adjectivate>" equal or equivalent in any way to "<same noun> of new"?

 

Is it by any chance that the particle "of new" after the noun could be a more formal, maybe unusual but correct equivalent to "new" before that same noun? Does this form of ajectivation even exist? Because I believe I have seen this form of adjectivation (could have been in a whole different context or even something entirely different) written somewhere. If I am not mistaken tha latter form seems to be one adequate to be used in long read poetry, novels, and the such.

 

An example follows:


[Before] "A new kingdom rises today."

 

 

[After] "A kingdom of new rises today."

So, are these two sentences correct? If not, are there any similar forms to this?

 

Thank you.
-Vítor Costa [Azores

adjectives nouns asked Nov 14 '12 at 23:24 Vítor Costa New member

3 answers


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Your first sentence, 'A new kingdom arises today' is correct. The reason 'of new' is incorrect is that you can't have an adjective as the object of a preposition,

There are some instances of what you are trying to do are proper, but the adjective must take the noun form when used as the object of the preposition.

 

John's ball.

The ball of John. Note I had to drop the possessive to make the work, otherwise, I would have a double genitive.

 

There may be some words that would fit into this construction without change, but I can't readily think of any. Someone else may be able to come up with an example.

link comment answered Nov 15 '12 at 12:18 Lewis Neidhardt Grammarly Fellow
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Lewis provides a great answer in terms of English grammar. I'll add some information that might help you in a broader sense.

 

As Lewis said, the object of a prepositional phrase must be a noun; it cannot be an adjective. However, a correctly formed prepositional phrase can function as an adjective. So if the prepositional phrase had been, for instance, of the new man, you could properly say -- The kingdom of the new man arises today

 

Your post suggests that Portuguese may be your native language. Speakers of Latinate languages (such as Portuguese, Spanish, and Italian) often have difficulty with English prepositional phrases. English relies less on prepositional forms than do the Latinate languages and uses alternate structures not found in the Romance languages.

 

I hope this helps.

link comment answered Nov 15 '12 at 17:47 Jeff Pribyl Grammarly Fellow
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Lewis provides a great answer in terms of English grammar. I'll add some information that might help you in a broader sense.

 

As Lewis said, the object of a prepositional phrase must be a noun; it cannot be an adjective. However, a correctly formed prepositional phrase can function as an adjective. So if the prepositional phrase had been, for instance, of the new man, you could properly say -- The kingdom of the new man arises today

 

Your post suggests that Portuguese may be your native language. Speakers of Latinate languages (such as Portuguese, Spanish, and Italian) often have difficulty with English prepositional phrases. English relies less on prepositional forms than do the Latinate languages and uses alternate structures not found in the Romance languages.

 

I hope this helps.

link comment answered Nov 16 '12 at 01:00 Jeff Pribyl Grammarly Fellow

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