Passionate vs passional

1

Which sentence is correct?

'I am a storyteller and a passionate screenplay writer.' or ' I am a storyteller and a passional screenplay writer."

See example:

I am a storyteller and a passionate screenplay writer.
asked Oct 09 '12 at 23:15 tom Masri New member

2 answers


1

Yes, definitely go with "passionate" here, if only to avoid confusion.  Passional is very rarely used as an adjective, and it probably should be used only when intending the older meaning of "passion": to suffer (willingly).

link comment answered Oct 10 '12 at 00:27 mysticete Contributor
-3

I disagree on two points. First, the whole meaning of your sentence. 'I am a storyteller and a passionate screenplay writer.' or ' I am a storyteller and a passional screenplay writer." Each of these sentences says that first: you are a storyteller, and second: a writer of passionate screeplays. Is that what you intend to say? Or, are you trying to say this? I am a storyteller and I am passionate about writing screenplays. I certainly could be wrong, but I think you are trying to express the latter, rather than the former.

 

As for passionate versus passional, certainly passionate is the more commonly used word. However, there is nothing wrong with choosing a lesser used form of the word. In many cases, it makes a passage more interesting. Here is an exact copy of the entry for passional from Dictionary.com. Note that the first two meanings given relate to your topic. Relating to the passion of Christ is given as the tertiary meaning.

 

pas·sion·al    [pash-uh-nl] Show IPA adjective 1. of, pertaining to, or marked by passion. 2. caused or accompanied by passion: a passional crime. noun 3. a book containing descriptions of the sufferings of saints and martyrs, for reading on their festivals.

link comment answered Oct 10 '12 at 01:01 Brownii Contributor

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