I am proud that I had worked for him for 10 years.

2

1) I am proud that I had worked for him for 10 years.

 

-> I am proud of having worked for him for 10 years.

 

 

2) I am proud that I graduated from the school.

 

-> I am proud of having graduated from the school.

 

 

3) I was proud that I had graduated from the school.

 

-> I was proud of having graduated from the school.

 

 

4) I am proud that I have worked for him for 10 years.

 

-> I am proud of having worked for him for 10 years.

 

All of the examples are okay to use to you? Thank you so much as usual and have a good day.

edited Oct 08 '12 at 02:42 Hans Contributor

2 answers


2

Rather than look at each example, let's start by looking at some elements common to all.

 

Proud of vs. proud to vs. proud that

 

You will hear each of these, and what you hear is sometimes incorrect in a formal sense.  Generally, proud of is used with nouns -- I am proud of my house -- and with gerund phrases serving as a noun -- I am proud of winning the game. Proud to is used with verbs in the infinitive -- I am proud to work with children. Proud that is used with restrictive clauses containing both a subject and a verb -- We are proud that they chose our team for the tournament. In some cases, that can be omitted without altering the meaning of the sentence -- We are proud they chose our team.

 

In your examples, you have replaced proud that with proud of having. Because proud of is used with gerund-form verbs (verbs ending with -ing), this would seem to be correct at first blush. After all, having sounds like a gerund. But other verb forms. usually the present participle, also end with -ing. The verb having + past participle -- having worked, having graduated -- is known as the perfect participle. 

 

The perfect participle is used to express that one action (the one where the perfect participle is used) is completed before the next action starts, or that one action has been going on for a period of time when another action starts.

 

So  we now see there are two problems with your sentences that use "having worked" or "having graduated."  (1) Proud of is used with nouns and gerunds, but not with verbs. "Having worked" is a verb and not a gerund. (2) The perfect participle is used to shorten or combine clauses that have the same subject. But your sentences do not have the needed second clause that expresses the second action.

 

While we may often hear "proud of having + past participle," it is not grammatically correct.

 

I hope this helps.

link edited Oct 08 '12 at 05:36 Jeff Pribyl Grammarly Fellow

Which means that the corrected version of "I am proud of having worked . . . " would be "I am proud to have worked . . ."

Peter GuessOct 08 '12 at 07:11

Yes.

Jeff PribylOct 08 '12 at 14:55

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2

Also, you have used the wrong tense in your first sentence:

 

I was proud that I had worked . . .

link answered Oct 08 '12 at 07:11 Peter Guess Expert

Thank you both, and then "I was proud that I had worked..." can be rewritten to "I was proud of having worked...", you think?

HansOct 08 '12 at 07:52

As Jeff mentioned, the phrase "proud of . . ." is used with nouns (& gerunds), "proud to . . . " with verbs. "I was proud to have worked . . ." is the correct form, because "having worked" is not a noun/noun phrase/gerund; it's a verb phrase (in this case, a perfect participle).

Peter GuessOct 08 '12 at 08:16

Oh, I got it. Thank you both as usual and have a good day.

HansOct 08 '12 at 08:19

Peter, how do you indicate that you are currently proud of something that occurred in the past? By changing it to "I was proud", you are saying that you are no longer pround.

Jeff PribylOct 08 '12 at 20:39

HsKyH7 asked, ". . . and then 'I was proud that I had worked . . .' can be rewritten to 'I was proud of having worked...', you think?" I corrected it to "I was proud to have worked . . ." This says that I was proud at that time without giving any information about the current status of my pride. "I am proud to have worked . . ." means I am currently proud – I may not have been proud immediately after the work finished, however. Ouch! My head hurts.

Peter GuessOct 08 '12 at 21:10

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