Question using 'as opposed to'

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"The man was such a card with the ladies as opposed to his male friends."

(Curious of the correct usage of the phrase 'as opposed to'.   Should it read "The man was such a card with the ladies as opposed to WITH his male friends."?)

grammar Word asked Sep 12 '12 at 18:09 Alex New member

1 answer


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Personally, I wouldn't use as opposed to at all in this sentence.  It is awkward and confusing.  Adding the word with does help.  Without it, one could interpret the sentence to mean that he was not a card with his male friends or that his male friends were not cards with the ladies. 

 

The man was such a card with the ladies, but not with his male friends.

The man was such a card with the ladies, but a stuffed shirt with his male friends. 

link answered Sep 12 '12 at 18:50 Patty T Grammarly Fellow

That was helpful, thank you!

AlexSep 12 '12 at 19:04

What do you mean by "card"? Thank you in advance.

sanjaySep 13 '12 at 16:33

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