Passive Voice

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How is it possible for a person to use past tense properly with this program? Everytime something in a paper happens to be in past tense, it determines "passive voice" is a problem.

See example:

During the Revolution, it was required for men to have guns as part of their status as militia.
asked Apr 17 '11 at 01:57 Kelly Melton-Mahoney New member

2 answers


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We don't know. In order to make the algorithms work at all a single ideal form of grammar had to be selected and adhered to. It appears that form is 6th grade level English reports. Unfortunately this disregards all intention of a paper, requiring the use of only 'active voice'.

 

Ex. I like cookies. Milk is good too. I tried them together and decided it is best.

 

link comment answered Apr 17 '11 at 02:43 Andrew Waddell Contributor
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Kelly, 

 

Many students' papers are marked up for passive voice because passive voice is often unclear. But, what is it? Passive voice, simply, is when you transform the object of a sentence into a subject. Here's an example to help you visualise:

 

 

Active voice:

"Lightning struck the tree." --> The subject is DOING the action.
(Subject and Actor: lightning, Verb: struck (past simple), Object: the tree)

 

In the passive voice we take the object of an active sentence and make it the subject of the passive sentence.

 

Passive voice:

"The tree was struck by lightning." --> The subject is RECEIVING the action
(Subject: The tree, Verb: was struck (past simple passive), Actor: lightning)


Here are examples of the passive in different tenses, compare them with the active voice:

 

 

Future simple passive:

- to be (future simple) + past participle.

ex: A cake will be baked by Becky.
(Active: Becky will bake a cake.)

 

Future progressive passive:

- to be (future progressive passive) + past participle

ex: A cake will be being baked by Becky.
(Active: Becky will be baking a cake.)

 

 

Future perfect passive:

- to be (future perfect passive) + past particple

ex: A cake will have been baked by Becky.
(Active: Becky will have baked a cake.)

 

Present simple passive:

- to be (present simple) + past participle

ex: A cake is baked by Becky.
(Active: Becky bakes a cake.)

 

 

Present progressive passive:

- to be (present progressive) + past participle

ex: A cake is being baked by Becky.
(Active: Becky is baking a cake.)

 

Present perfect passive:

- to be (present perfect) + past participle

ex: A cake has been baked by Becky.
(Active: Becky has been baking a cake.)

 

 

Past simple passive:

- to be (past simple) + past participle

ex. A cake was baked by Becky.
(Active: Becky baked a cake.)

 

Past progressive passive:

- to be (past progressive) + past participle

ex: A cake was being baked by Becky.
(Active: Becky was baking a cake.)

 

 

Past perfect passive:

-to be (past perfect) + past participle

ex: A cake had been baked by Becky.
(Active: Becky had baked a cake.)
 

link comment answered Apr 18 '11 at 17:14 Kimberly Expert

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