Does this sentence have too many "ands"?

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The sentence: "There is a relationship between schizophrenia and knowledge and contact."

 

What I'm trying to say is that there is a relationship between 2 things:  (1) "schizophrenia" and (2) "knowlede and contact" (together). There has to be a way to reduce the ands. It's driving me insane.

 

 

Thank you in advance.

1 answer


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This problem does make for an awkward sentence.  I’m going to change the example to (1) bread and (2) peanut butter and jelly.  Instead of there being the subject, I’d make bread the subject.  Bread has a relationship with peanut butter and jelly

 

The reason I changed the example is because I don’t think there is a relationship between the disease of schizophrenia and whatever you mean by “knowledge and contact.”  That just doesn’t make sense to me.  I suspect that you are discussing some sort of statistic on how the disease is diagnosed, but your meaning is very unclear. I'd rework the sentence for clarity.

link answered Aug 19 '12 at 06:31 Patty T Grammarly Fellow

Yeah, it makes sense now. Appreciate your help.Its a part of my report on the stigma of schizophrenia. I just made it as short as possible so it didn't confuse people. The full sentence was "There is a relationship between the attitude students have towards schizophrenia and their knowledge and contact with the illness"

eduardoAug 19 '12 at 06:41

Well, that makes a lot more sense, Eduardo. Cutting out parts of the sentence caused confusion. I don't think there is a problem with having "and" twice in that sentence. But you ned to add one wor. It should end with their knowledge OF and contact with the illness.

Patty TAug 19 '12 at 23:42

I really dislike the comment box. I can't always see all of the box and you can't edit it. Hopefully I will type correctly this time. "But you need to add one word."

Patty TAug 19 '12 at 23:43

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