WIN $50 - The Grammar Explanation Challenge - “Misuse of like or as”

2

The Grammar Explanation Challenge - “Misuse of like or as”

 

 

Are you a budding Grammarian? Why not try improving the grammar explanations at Grammarly.com?  The best, original explanation will win $50!

 

To enter, simply:

1) Create a Grammarly Answers account via sign-up or Facebook at answers.grammarly.com.
2) Rewrite our current grammar explanation (see below) so that it is clearer and more effective.
3) Post your answer here, by clicking 'Post your answer'. (Entries must provide short and long explanations and be original work.)

 

Other Grammarly Answers users will vote for the answer they think is the most understandable and most helpful. The author of the highest-voted answer will win $50 and the answer will be featured on Grammarly.com!  So, put your grammar caps on and start brainstorming!

(See below for more contest rules.)

 

Please improve the following grammar explanation:

 

 

Title: Misuse of ‘like’ or ‘as’

Review this sentence for use of “like” and “as”.

Long explanation:

Ensure you have properly used “as” in your sentence.

Because this sentence needs a preposition, consider changing “as” to “like”.

The confusion in using “like” or “as” is caused by a lack of understanding of the word’s role.  “Like” is used as a preposition, telling where, when or how the noun in the sentence is doing whatever it may be doing.  “As” is used like a conjunction, joining two clauses. A general rule-of-thumb is that “like” should be followed by an object (to make a prepositional phrase), and “as” should be followed by a clause containing a verb.  Most of the time, “like” compares two things.

Incorrect: Imagine a grown woman acting as a child.
In this sentence, “as” is working like a preposition, telling how the grown woman is acting. The object of the sentence is “a child”.  “As” should be changed to like: Imagine a grown woman acting like a child.

Incorrect: The little girl, as her mother, has bright red hair.
Even though this sentence has a verb after “as”, the verb belongs to the first clause, “The little girl has bright red hair”.  “As” should be changed to like: The little girl, like her mother, has bright red hair.

Correct: The little girl has bright red hair, as does her mother.
This sentence is correct because we have added the second verb “does”, so “as” is connecting the two clauses.

 

Short explanation:

Because this sentence needs a preposition, consider changing “as” to “like”.

Incorrect: The little girl, as her mother, has bright red hair.
Correct: The little girl, like her mother, has bright red hair.
Correct: The little girl has bright red hair, as does her mother.

 

Remember to share this post with your friends on Facebook and Twitter to give them a chance to win $50!

 

____________________________________________

Contest Rules and Terms:
--  Contestants must provide both short and long explanations
--  Contestants must produce original work and will be disqualified for plagiarism
--  Contestants may submit no more than two different answers
--  The contest will run for 14 days beginning on 4 April 2011 and ending at 0.00 EST 19 April 2011
--  The winner will be determined by number of votes and will be announced on 20 April 2011
--  All entries become property of Grammarly.com 

edited Apr 04 '11 at 14:53 Kimberly Expert

3 answers


4

Short:

"Like" shows similarity.

         1. That girl is like a fiesty tiger.

 

"As" makes a definite comparison.        

         2. That girl is as fiesty as a tiger.

 

 1. She is similar to a fiesty tiger.

2. She is just as fiesty as a fiesty tiger.

 

 

 

Long:

 

"Like" is usually informal. The clouds look like they are bringing rain.

"As" or "As if" is usually formal. The clouds look as if they are bringing rain.

 

"Like" is usually used as a preposition.

1. She is acting like a dog. Correct.

2. She is acting as a dog. Incorrect.

 

"As" is usually used as a conjunction.

1. She is as beautiful as the rising sun.Correct. (As is joining words together to make a comparison.)

2. She is like beautiful like the rising sun. Incorrect.

link edited Apr 08 '11 at 01:12 Hannah New member

feisty, not fiesty Tuula SalonenFeb 15 '12 at 23:17

add comment
1
The preposition 'like' can be used to compare subject and object in a sentence. For example: The girl's hair was red, like her Mother's. If using 'as' to show subject/object comparison, then a second 'as' is always required. For example: The girl's hair was as red as her Mother's. If only one 'as' is used when comparing subject and object, then both subject clause and object clause must contain temporal verb. For example: The girl's hair was red, as was her Mother's. Or: The girl's hair is red, as is her Mother's.
link answered Apr 05 '11 at 19:19 Joy Goodall New member

Joy, This is a great start. I encourage you to edit your submission and include both long and short explanations. Good luck! -- Kim KimberlyApr 05 '11 at 22:07

Long explanation: The preposition 'like' can be used to compare subject and object in a sentence. For example: The girl's hair was red, like her Mother's. If using 'as' to show subject/object comparison, then a second 'as' is always required. For example: The girl's hair was as red as her Mother's. If only one 'as' is used when comparing subject and object, then both subject clause and object clause must contain a temporal verb. For example: The girl's hair was red, as was her Mother's. Or: The girl's hair is red, as is her Mother's. Short explanation: When comparing subject and object, use the preposition 'like' or always include either a second 'as' or a temporal verb in both subject and object clause. Correct: The girl's hair was red, like her Mother's. Incorrect: The girl's hair was red as her Mother's. Correct: The girl's hair was as red as her Mother's. Correct: The girl's hair was red, as was her Mother's. Joy GoodallApr 06 '11 at 06:04

add comment
0

Oh right I am too late, but well, it is a good exercise anyhow.

 

Title: Misuse of ‘like’ or ‘as’
Review this sentence for use of “like” and “as”.

Long explanation:
“Like” and “as” are commonly confused regarding function and meaning. “Like” is used as a preposition to compare the noun to something else, for descriptive purposes. “As” is used as a conjunction that joins two clauses, and it can sometimes have a different meaning to “like”.
In a sentence, mostly “like” should be followed by an object, making a prepositional phrase; “as” should be followed by a complete clause with a verb. An exception is where “as” is used to mean “in the role of,” so while “She was acting as a dog” is incorrect, “She was acting as a guardian” is correct. Another conventional use for “as” is in direct comparison where two things are in some way the same, “as tall as…”
Example: Incorrect: “The man was behaving as a child.” In this sentence, “as” is a preposition that tells how the man was behaving, and object is “a child.” Correct sentence would be either “The man was behaving like a child” or “The man was behaving as if he were a child,” where “as” does connect two clauses, “the man was behaving” and “were a child.” If the “as” is used for direct comparison, it must bracket the adjective, for example “the man was as silly as a child,” where replacing “as” with “like” – “The man was like silly like a child” would be obviously wrong.  

Short explanation:

Consider using “like” instead of “as” when using it as preposition, except when using the structure, “a is as ___ as b” for direct comparison. Otherwise "as" behaves as a conjunction.

Incorrect: “He is tall as his brother.” Correct: ”He is tall like his brother.” Correct: “He is as tall as his brother.”  Correct: "He is tall, as is his brother."

link comment answered Feb 16 '12 at 00:12 Tuula Salonen New member

Your answer


Write at least 20 characters

Have a question about English grammar, style or vocabulary use? Ask now to get help from Grammarly experts for FREE.