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Should I put an article 'the' before the kitchen and hospital?can I write ' In hospital or at hospital' and ' in kitchen' thanks.

asked May 09 '12 at 12:47 May New member

2 answers


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Lewis's answer reflects American usage.  We Americans insist on using an article ("a" or "the") before hospital, and it grates on my ear when the BBC drops the article -- "The victims are being tended to at hospital."

 

As Winston Churchill said, "Britain and America are two nations divided by a common language.”

link comment answered May 09 '12 at 15:54 Jeff Pribyl Grammarly Fellow
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For "kitchen", yes, you have to use an article almost all the time. It's "in the kitchen", "to the kitchen", etc. You would almost always use "the" instead of "a", because the listener will almost always know which kitchen you mean.

 

One exception is "a new kitchen" ("I'm putting in a new kitchen"). You could put in any kitchen, so that's "a".

 

For "hospital", it's more complicated. I'm from New Zealand, so this is British English usage.

 

You can often say "in hospital" or even "at hospital" without an article. It depends on the emphasis. If the listener doesn't care which hospital you mean, or if it's obvious which hospital you mean, then it's fine to leave out the article.

 

For example, "My mother went into hospital yesterday." The important thing is that my mother is sick enough to be in hospital, not which hospital it is.

 

Compare that with "My daughter went into the children's hospital in Auckland yesterday. It's 4 hours away from home so I'm going to stay in Auckland until she recovers." There, the hospital's location is important.

 

There's another complication: it's very, very common to identify a particular hospital by its name or location, with no article. For example, "My daughter went into Starship hospital in Auckland yesterday" or "I'll meet you at the main entrance to Dunedin hospital".

link comment answered May 14 '13 at 00:06 Rebecca New member

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