"If I were you,"

0

Is it:

 

If I were you and I was interupted like that, I would say something about it. 

 

or 

 

If I were you and I were insulted, I would say something about it. 

 

Or something else entirely? 

3 answers


2

I'd like to tweak Jack's reasoning a bit.  The word "if" is not what indicates whether the situation is real or unreal.  It is the entire context. 

 

Since I cannot possibly be you, it is an unreal condition and the subjunctive mood is used - If I were you.  It can be a bit confusing when adding the second condition - If I was/were insulted.  In this case, we already know I can't be you.  So I also can't have been insulted.  So you still use the subjunctive mood.

 

If can also be used with the indicative mood.  Let's say we know Joe is driving from one city to another on a major highway. We hear on the news that the highway was shut down between exits 7 & 10.  If Joe was north of Exit 7 when the highway shut down, he will be stuck for hours.

link comment answered Aug 18 at 19:48 Patty T Grammarly Fellow
0

In both sentences you must use "were" twice. This is because you are suggesting a condition contrary to fact, which is indicated by the word "if." When you suggest a condition contrary to fact the subjunctive mood is being used, and it calls for a verb change from was to were.

link comment answered Aug 18 at 18:36 Jack Morais New member
-1

If I were insulted, I would say something about it. 

 

If I was interupted like that, I would say something about it. 

link comment answered Aug 18 at 16:37 Sanjay Contributor

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