Adverb Clauses Beginning with Present Participle?

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Can an adverb clause that is not "cause and effect" of the subject, but rather further explaining that subject, begin with a present participle?

 

For example:

"The purpose of the question is for the student to summarize the article, explaining the major points in that article."

-instead of-

"The purpose of the question is for the student to summarize the article; [while doing so], explaining the major points in that article."

 

Here, the word "explaining" is not the effect of the summarization. It is just one more task or criteria that the student must keep in mind while summarizing to get the task done properly.

 

Also, is [he should be] required before [explaining]?

as in

"The purpose of the question is for the student to summarize the article; [while doing so], [he should be] explaining the major points in that article."

 

I'm not even sure if the second sentence is grammatically correct.

 

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Another simpler example:

 

"You should organize your desk, placing each item in its respective drawer."

 

Is this grammatically correct?

Should there be a semicolon instead of the comma?  

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