get or got?

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I just hear English speakers saying I get used to, I've get my scarf, I get a good subject..but grammatically the place of using this verb suppose it to be got or gotten in the second example..I just wanted to ask if we should say get or got in these possessions..Thanks

n asked Apr 10 at 20:13 w.m New member

1 answer


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There are differences between writing and speaking.  Generally, speaking is more informal than writing.  Another difference is in the pronunciation of words.  When reading the written word, the reader "hears" the word in the way he would pronounce it.  But the writer might pronounce the word differently.  A very common example is the words pin and pen.  In the US, there are some regions where the listener from another region will hear pen and pin instead of pin and pen.  I have talked to people on the phone from a couple parts of the country who can't understand what my name is.  When I say Patty, they think they heard potty.  Of course, since this means toilet, they get very confused. 

 

If you look up information about English dialects, which I just did, you will see that there are at least 28 different dialects in England alone.  That doesn't include the rest of Great Britain.  In the US, there are about 40 unique dialects.  These are all native English speakers, and they all have differences in the way words are pronounced.

 

I say all of this because your example of "I've get my scarf" makes no sense whatsoever.  It is not uncommon for a speaker to say "got" instead of "gotten" or "have gotten".  That is "normal" bad grammar.  No matter how poorly educated a native speaker is, people just do not make the statement as you have written it.  It just doesn't happen.  The only conclusion I can draw is that you are hearing a certain dialect, and interpreting it in the wrong way. 

link comment answered Apr 10 at 20:42 Patty T Grammarly Fellow

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