What is the correct punctuation in this sentence?

0

   Putting on her warm coat; which she normally did regardless of the weather, she took one last glimpse about and strode to the front gate with Shane in tow.

 

   Putting on her warm coat: which she normally did regardless of the weather, she took one last glimpse about and strode to the front gate with Shane in tow.

 

   Putting on her warm coat, which she normally did regardless of the weather, she took one last glimpse about and strode to the front gate with Shane in tow.

 

   Putting on her warm coat which she normally did regardless of the weather, she took one last glimpse about and strode to the front gate with Shane in tow.

 

Someone on another site suggested I punctuate the sentence like this one below but I am not sure....

 

   Putting on her warm coat - which she normally did regardless of the weather, she took one last glimpse about - and strode to the front gate with Shane in tow.

 

Any help here would be greatly appreciated.

1 answer


3

I would go with the third version.

 

Putting on her warm coat, which she normally did regardless of the weather, she took one last glimpse about and strode to the front gate with Shane in tow.

 

Neither the colon or semicolon are correct.  The first phrase (putting on her warm coat) is an introductory clause.  This is always followed by a comma.  The second phrase (which she normally did regardless of the weather) is a non-restrictive clause.  Such a clause needs to be surrounded on both ends by the same punctuation.  Usually it is with commas, but it can be parentheses or dashes.  Since you already need a comma before it because of the introductory clause, I would stick with the commas.  You could uses parentheses by including it as part of the introductory phrase.  That would need a comma right after the end parenthesis.

 

Putting on her warm coat (which she normally did regardless of the weather), she took one last glimpse about and strode to the front gate with Shane in tow.

 

The suggested dashes don't work at all.  If you delete the introductory and non-restrictive clauses, you have a complete sentence that requires nothing but a period at the end.

 

She took one last glimpse about and strode to the front gate with Shane in tow.

 

There is no comma (or any other punctuation) in front of "and" because there is no independent clause after the conjunction.

 

On the other hand, you can take poetic license with the rules when writing fiction.  Unorthodox punctuation can be used to create a mood, build suspense, or give pause to the reader's thoughts.  I suggest only breaking the rules when it serves a definite purpose.

link answered Apr 03 at 14:37 Patty T Grammarly Fellow

Many many thanks for your help. I have gone with what you suggested as I did think it was correct.

lee leeederApr 18 at 00:07

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