Conjunction choice

1

Which is the best conjunction to use to combine the following two sentences:

 

(a) You don’t need many ingredients.  (b) They are all in your corner grocery store.

 

I think "but," "and," or "yet."

 

I do NOT think that "for" is correct to use in this case.

asked Mar 16 at 21:05 Bonnie Brady New member

2 answers


2

Elaborating on Lewis' answer...

 

Both (a) and (b) are positive thoughts, so "and" can join them.

(a) You don’t need many ingredients.  (YAY!)

(b) They are all in your corner grocery store.  (YAY!)

You don't need many ingredients, and they are all in your corner grocery store.

 

If both (a) and (b) are negative thoughts, "and" still connects them.

(a) You need many ingredients.  (BOO!)

(b) They are not all in your corner grocery store. (BOO!)

You need many ingredients, and they are not all in your local grocery store.

 

"But" and "yet" are used when there is a conflict, as Lewis pointed out.  So you need one negative and one positive. 

(a) You don't need many ingredients. (YAY!)

(b) They are not all in your corner grocery store. (BOO!)

You don't need many ingredients, but they are not all in your corner grocery store.

(a) You need many ingredients. (BOO!)

(b) They are all in your corner grocery store. (YAY!)

You need many ingredients, but they are all in your corner grocery store. 

 

I would not use yet in this context, but that is more of a personal choice.

 

You are correct that for is not the right word.  As a conjunction, for means since or because.  The second sentene would need to have a causal relationship with the first sentence, which is not the case.  An example of using for:

You can shop at your corner grocery store, for all of the ingredients can be found there.

link answered Mar 16 at 22:10 Patty T Grammarly Fellow

I'm impressed with this one, Patty. That's the same method my teacher used to teach multiplying positive and negative numbers.

Lewis NeidhardtMar 16 at 23:43

I love math as much as I love words. :-)

Patty TMar 17 at 14:06

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1

'And' would be the conjunction to use.  'But' and 'yet' imply some conflict between the sentences.

 

You don’t need many ingredients, and they are all in your corner grocery store.

 

Here's what I mean about conflict.

You don’t need many ingredients, but they are not all in your corner grocery store.

link comment answered Mar 16 at 21:10 Lewis Neidhardt Grammarly Fellow

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