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I spoke with Mr. Terrance Adams on the matter of me attending the Youth Program Assistant meeting (C.A. L. M.) held on Wednesday at 2:00pm. He has no issues with me attending the meeting; however, he did want me to inform you that today's meeting has been cancel do to adverse weather.

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He has no issues with me attending the meeting; however, he did want me to inform you that today's meeting had been canceled due to adverse weather.
asked Feb 12 at 15:42 Quincy Peterson New member

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In your first sentence, the acronym in parentheses has two problems. 

 

An acronym is a shortened way of naming somethine that otherwise has a long name, and the shortened name makes a word you can pronounce.  You do not necessarily need the periods after each letter.  That is a matter of style, not grammar. If the periods are kept, then keep the spacing the same between each one.  You have no space between the firt two and a space between the others. 

 

An example of an acronym is NASA.  The shortened name is a word you can pronounce.  Some acronyms become common words such as laser, scuba, and radar. 

 

Another way to shorten a long name is initialization.  This is when we use the beginning letters but it doesn't make a pronounceable word:  CIA, FYI, HR.

 

When we have a long name that will be used repeatedly throughout an article or essay, we spell out the entire name the first time and immediately write the shortened version inside parentheses.  Then, the shortened version can be used alone each time after that.

 

The problem is that your acronym seems to have absolutely nothing to do with the long name before it.  What does CALM stand for?  Certainly not "Youth Program Assistant Meeting." 

link comment answered Feb 13 at 14:20 Patty T Grammarly Fellow

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