the gerund

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I know we should rewrite some letters at the end of the words but I don't know exact rule for it...is there is special rule or not? and if there isn't any how we can recognize the places we should rewrite the letters?

asked Jan 25 at 08:13 w.m New member

3 answers


1

The important part of gerunds is knowing your noun functions.

 

This is a fundamental tenet of our language and is applies across many aspects of grammar:  noun clauses, infinitives, gerunds, etc.

 

These are the most important 5:

Subject

Direct Object

Indirect Object

Object of a Preposition

Predicate Nominative

 

Allow me to illustrate a gerund taking a few of the functions above:

Running is awesome.  (What is awesome? Running=subject=gerund)

I hate running. (I hate what? Running = direct object=gerund)

I am tired from running. (from what? Running=object of a preposition=gerund)

 

The problem many grammar students have is that they confuse gerund phrases and participial phrases.

Remember, gerund phrases act as nouns and participial phrases act as adjectives.

This is why you MUST know your noun functions to be able to correctly label gerunds:

 

Example:

Aaron, running down the hall, fell flat on his face.

       (running down the hall)=describing Aaron=adjective=Participial Phrase

Running down the hall is awesome.

       (Running down the hall)=subject of sentence=noun=Gerund Phrase

link comment edited Jan 26 at 01:51 Aaron Prejean Expert
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A gerund is the present participle form of a verb used as a noun and ends in 'ing'.

link comment answered Jan 25 at 15:59 Lewis Neidhardt Grammarly Fellow
-1

What letters are you refering to ,exactly ?

 

if you're asking about ( -ing , -ed , ....etc ) then it depends on a tense

if ( -ly ...) it's an adverb

 

 

Am I on my way now for answering your question ?or you may like to define what you really mean about those letters you're so referring to upthere ?

link comment answered Jan 25 at 10:33 Lilly New member

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