competition / competitor

0

"Jones is certain to win the race; there's just no competition."

"Jones is certain to win the race; there's just no competitor."

 

I have searched for the definition of competition and I was wondering if competition is used for the meaning of competitor as well? They are interchangeable?

 

competition: the people or groups that are competing against you, especially in business or in a sport[↪ compete, competitor]

 

competitor: a person, team, company etc that is competing with another.

 

Thank you as usual in advance.

edited Jan 15 at 16:28 Hans Contributor

3 answers


1

No, the two are not the same. The phrase "no competition" means that the other competitors are not at the same level. If an Olympic gold medal winner entered an event at a local high school, we can all guess the outcome. Even though there are other competitors, there is really no competiton.

link comment answered Jan 15 at 17:35 Patty T Grammarly Fellow
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If you say, there is no competition, then there is no event taking place. 

To me, the second sentence makes sense.

"Jones is certain to win the race; there's just no competitor."

link comment answered Jan 15 at 17:13 Sanjay Contributor
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My answer is also the second sentence: "Jones is certain to win the race; there's just no competitor."  It shows that there is noone to compete Jones while in the first sentence we can't talk about competition when there is said to be no event for competition. 

Degemu Shertaga (dshertaga@ymail.com)

link comment answered Jan 16 at 14:29 Degemu New member

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