Feel as if / as though / like / that

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My teacher says 'feel like S + V' and 'feel as if S + V' and 'feel that S + V' and 'feel as though S + V' mean the same and 'feel that S + V' is a bit more definite, but we can say all of them mean the same. Do you agree with this? Thank you so much as usual in advance.

edited Jan 06 at 15:10 Hans Contributor

1 answer


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First, we use feel + adjective to describe mental or physical states:

I feel hot. Can you please turn on the air conditioner?
Jack said he feels sick, so he is going to leave the office early.
This pillow feels soft! I love it!

We also use feel + like + noun to describe mental or physical states:

I didn’t sleep well last night. I feel like a zombie today.
This pillow feels like a brick. I want a softer one.

In a similar way, we can use also use feel + like + subject + verb:

I didn’t sleep well last night. I feel like I am a zombie today.
This pillow feels like it is a brick. I want a softer one.

It is also possible to use feel + as if & feel + as though with the same meaning:

I didn’t sleep well last night. I feel as though I am a zombie today.
This pillow feels as if it is a brick. I want a softer one.

We can also use feel like to mean want. After feel like you can use a gerund or noun:

I feel like eating ice cream.
We were talking about lunch and Jack said he feels like pizza. How about you?

We use feel + noun to talk about a physical perception or the sense of touch:

I felt something on my leg and it was a spider! Yuck!

link comment answered Jan 06 at 16:15 Sanjay Contributor

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