Present progressive VS. Present

0

1) I saw her dance.

 

2) I saw her dancing.

 

I think that the two sentences does not mean the same or are there cases where present progressive tense and present tense are used for the same meaning?

 

ex) I am studying English. VS. I study English.

      I saw her wait in line. VS. I saw her waiting in line.

 

Thank you so much as usual and have a good day.

edited Dec 16 '13 at 02:39 Hans Contributor

1 answer


2

I saw her dance.

I saw her dancing.

'Dance' and 'dancing' are not verbs in these sentences. 'Dance' is a noun, and 'dancing' is a present participle used as a noun.  They mean about the same thing, but I would infer that 'I saw her dance.' means that the whole performance was seen, while 'dancing' doesn't imply the entire performance.

 

I am studying English. VS. I study English.

Here, you have the present progressive and simple present tenses of the verb 'to study'.  The present progressive indicates that studying is happening at the present time, either with a book open right now or currently enrolled in a class.

 

 

I saw her wait in line. VS. I saw her waiting in line.

This is back to a noun and a present participle used as a noun as in the first example.

link comment answered Dec 16 '13 at 14:44 Lewis Neidhardt Grammarly Fellow

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