Usage of 'it'

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1) It is because I love you.

 

2) It means that I love you.

 

3) It is not that I love you.

 

 

I was wondering what the "it" in each sentence functions as?

 

1) It is a pronoun referring to something mentioned before.

 

2) It is a pronoun referring to something mentioned before. 

 

3) It is a pronoun referring to something mentioned before or "it" here has no meaning like it is true that I love you and it is called dummy it.

 

What do you experts think?  Thank you so much as always and have a good and safe day.

asked Dec 04 '13 at 08:14 Hans Contributor

1 answer


2

I love how people put sentences down that are clearly out of context and pretend that the rest of the conversation disappears.

Yes. Pronouns require antecedents.
No. You don't always have to see them in the sentence for them to exist.


(Points over at Sanjay)
He is my buddy.
Did I ever, at any point, say the name of my antecedent?   No.  That doesn't mean one doesn't exist.

 

Your sentences:
(1) It is because I love you.
This is not the same as saying "I love you".
There WAS an antecedent in this conversation that you have chosen to omit.
"Awww... This is so beautiful... I can't believe you did this!"
"It is because I love you."
It is referring to the act of doing "this".

 

(2) same for 2.

WHAT means that I love you?  It can't make since with out a referrent antecedent.

 

(3) same for 3.
"Wow!  I can't believe what you did for me!! You must really love me!"
"It is not that I love you... I was just doing the right thing..."
"It" is referring/renaming to "what you did" a noun clause... just like any other pronoun.
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Long story short: Try opening a conversation over the phone with "It is because I love you." You can't because there IS an antecedent that you have chosen to ignore for the purpose of asking your question. -AP  

link comment edited Dec 04 '13 at 12:45 Aaron Prejean Expert

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