All right and Alright... Part 2

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This is my second question with Alright and All right.  Like a follow-up question.  So alright is a word, my boyfriend was happy about winning that argument by the way.  But I am not ready to give in..  What if you say, I took a test and I got the answers all right.  I got the answers alright sounds like a brag statement instead of just saying that you didn’t miss any (say it out loud: I got the answers Alright!!) So all right CAN be separated to two words or one word and it means something different together, right?  Hope I am right!

all right alright asked Aug 30 '13 at 00:13 Lina Newbride New member

3 answers


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Here is what Oxford Dictionaries has to say about this question:
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There is no logical reason for insisting that all right should be written as two words rather than as alright, when other single-word forms such as altogether have long been accepted. Nevertheless, alright is still regarded as being unacceptable in formal writing.

link comment edited Aug 30 '13 at 11:49 Patty T Grammarly Fellow
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I don't need to weigh in here with these two experts lining it out, but I did want to make note that "Alright!" as you used it was an interjection and that "all right" sounds more like an affirmation than an exclamation showing emotion.

 

I would also note that a dictionary site

grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-speech/interjections/list-of-interjections.html

actually lists "alright", "alrighty", and "alrighty-roo" under a rather extensive list of interjections, and that "all right" is completely omitted from this list.

 

That being the case, my assumption, without ANY grammatical basis other than my own (excellent) intuition, is to use "alright!" as an interjection.

 

(By the way, this agrees with previous poster in regards to formal writing since it is unlikely interjections would be used in formal writing.)

link comment edited Sep 02 '13 at 01:18 Aaron Prejean Expert
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'Alright' is not a word. It is always two words: all right.

It's easy to confuse because 'already' is a word, and people will mix them up.

link comment answered Aug 30 '13 at 02:10 Lewis Neidhardt Grammarly Fellow

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