Plurals

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Should it be 'a knight of the twelfth and thirteenth century' or 'a knight of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries'?

Plurals asked Aug 28 '13 at 15:52 sarah jones New member

3 answers


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The key is the word "and". When you use that, you're speaking of more than one ...hence plural.

link comment answered Aug 28 '13 at 20:36 Geannene Ledbetter Contributor
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Since you're speaking of two centuries, you should use the plural.

link comment answered Aug 28 '13 at 19:54 Lewis Neidhardt Grammarly Fellow
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Lewis and Geannene are correct. However, since you are talking about a single knight, he was of the twelfth OR thirteenth century, not both. If you want to use AND, then there should be plural knights for plural centuries.

link comment answered Aug 28 '13 at 22:45 Patty T Grammarly Fellow

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