omission of 'which is'/ passive Vs active

0

What is the part of speech of 'regarded' in "a quality regarded as characteristic of poems"?

shouldn't the verb be in its passive form?
why isn't it ".... [which is] regarded ...."?

oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/poetry

 

and in another case: "a small lizard with wide feet, found especially in warm countries", dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/gecko?q=gecko

 

and also: "Words used to describe writing or speech style" www.macmillandictionary.com/thesaurus-category/british/Words-used-to-describe-writing-or-speech-style

 

in all these examples, why shouldn't the verbs be in their passive form (i.e. which is found, words that are used)?

 

i am a ESL learner and i am very confused with these usages! please help :))))) thanks thanks!!!

1 answer


2

In English, there are times when certain words are omitted but are understood.

[You] Go away! The 'you' is understood but not written.

He is taller than I [am].

 

...a quality [which is] regarded as characteristic of poems...

...a small lizard with wide feet, [which is] found especially in warm countries.

Words [that are] used to describe writing or speech style.

link answered Aug 01 '13 at 14:46 Lewis Neidhardt Grammarly Fellow

Thank you so much for answering!!! This applies to most newspaper headlines, right?

Is there a rule for such omission?

jadehkAug 07 '13 at 01:29

add comment

Your answer


Write at least 20 characters

Have a question about English grammar, style or vocabulary use? Ask now to get help from Grammarly experts for FREE.