noun phrase or participial phrase

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Regarding this sentence found from Oxford online dictionary,

 

"He returned to Britain in 1939, having resided abroad for many years."

 

is the part following comma indeed a noun phrase, that:

 

"having": have + ing, changed from verb to noun

"resided": reside + ed, changed from verb to noun

"having resided abroad for many years": having resided abroad =>participial phrase;  for many years =>prepositional phrase

 

Are the above analysis correct?  

asked Nov 25 '11 at 06:10 CF LOK New member

2 answers


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uhm, not sure of the third (honestly, never used the terms "participial phrase"and "prepositional phrase"; but I'm quite sure the first two analysis are not correct: neither "having" not "resided" have changed form to noun. Not to me, at least. "having resided" means "after he had resided", which is still a verbal form (he had resided).

link comment answered Nov 26 '11 at 00:15 alessandra New member
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I like the new usage of the word verbal, as in pertaining to a verb, it speaks volumes. 

link comment answered Nov 29 '11 at 13:31 Joe Martinez New member

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