comma splices, run-ons and sentences fragments

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The stunt is designed so that  a person appears to be lying full length in a box that rest on a table, the hands, feet, and head protude through holes in the ends of the box. Is this sentences a comma splices, run-on, or sentenes fragment?

asked Oct 05 '11 at 21:42 Fanny Gonzalez New member

1 answer


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A sentence fragment is a phrase that does not have a subject and verb, i.e. "Like the kind at the cinema." (sentence fragment)  You can correct a fragment by adding a subject (actor) and verb (action), i.e. "I like popcorn like the kind at the cinema."

 

Ask yourself, is there a thing or person (subject) doing something (verb)?

 

A run-on sentence is a the combination of more than one sentence together without appropriate ending punctuation. For example, "I like reading something new every day I think that people should read more often and it is sad that more people do not." (sentence fragment)  The correct way to write this would be to break up the complete thoughts into separate sentences -- "I like reading new every day.  I think that people should read more often; it is sad that more people do not."

 

Ask yourself, where does one idea end and a new idea start?

 

A comma-splice happens when you join to complete thoughts (sentences) together with just a comma and not another word like 'and' or 'but'. For example, "She ran to the store to buy some eggs, she came home with candies!"  The way to correct this error is to add a conjunction (a word like 'and' or 'but') after the comma -- "She ran to the store to buy some eggs, but came home with candies!" 

 

Nota Bene: Comma-splices are often present within run-on sentences.

 

Ask yourself, where does one idea end and another start?  If there is a comma, have I used an appropriate conjunction or is it better to use a period?

 

So, if we look at your sentence: 

 

The stunt is designed so that a person appears to be lying full length in a box that rests on a table, the hands, feet, and head protude through holes in the ends of the box.

 

1) Is there a thing or person (subject) doing something (verb)?

 

Yes, "the stunt" is the thing, and "is designed" is the verb (note, this sentence is in passive voice.)

 

2) Ask yourself, where does one idea end and a new idea start?

 

One idea ends with "on the table".  The new idea starts with "hands, feet, and head".  This is a run-on sentence.

 

 3) If there is a comma, have I used an appropriate conjunction or is it better to use a period?

 

Yes, there is a comma.  So this is a comma-splice.  Consider adding a conjunction after the comma and before "hands".  Alternatively (and what I wouls recommend), you can change the comma to period and start a new sentence with "hands".

link comment answered Oct 07 '11 at 15:34 Kimberly Expert

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