Is this correct? Does it make sense?

1

Paul’s exhortation to forget the past does not mean the mind is erased of all remembrance. 

asked Jul 13 '13 at 03:40 Susan New member

It's understandable, but I would not say, it is correct and it is clumsey. It would be better written in the following fashion if you wanted to maintain the same basic vocabulary and structure: Paul's exhortation to "forget the past" does not mean that the mind is erased of all rememberance. I would ditch the word, "rememberance" and use memory. If the word, "that " is not added as I did, I would think a comma would be in order in the same spot.

Terry ShanholtzerJul 13 '13 at 12:06

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6 answers


1

This sentence is perfect.

link comment answered Jul 13 '13 at 04:10 Ahmad Barnard Expert
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Remembrance is not the same as memory (at least, in UK English)

In UK English remembrance is the ACTION of remembering something, and in particular, the action of remembering the dead, so it does not make sense to say that the mind is erased of all remembrance.

 

Secondly, I do not think it is correct to use "erase" as an intransitive verb. You erase something - so a something, like a memory, can be erased from the mind, but the mind cannot be erased OF something.

 

My rewording would be 

"Paul’s exhortation to forget the past does not mean that all memory of the past is erased."

link comment answered Jul 13 '13 at 07:27 Tork&Grunt New member
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Tork&Grunt's advice is spot on, and accurate for US as well as UK English. Although the original sentence is correct (except for noted changes), it sounds a little awkward and stilted. Tork's rewording is okay, though I'm not generally a fan of reusing a noun in a sentence. This could easily be fixed through the gentle use of a thesaurus, of course.

link comment answered Jul 13 '13 at 08:51 Corrie New member
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The sentence is grammatically correct.

link comment answered Jul 13 '13 at 06:37 Jeffrey Brown New member
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I think the sentence is perfect.  I like the feeling it gives me as I read it. 

link comment answered Jul 13 '13 at 11:03 Lisa White New member
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I would follow Tork&Grunt's advice, as I believe it is spot on, although I agree with Corrie in that you should not reuse "past", but rephrase it somehow. A thesaurus is a great little tool. :)

link comment answered Jul 13 '13 at 13:43 Beckers New member

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