COUNTABLE OR UNCOUNTABLE : MANSLAUGHTER

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Is "MANSLAUGHTER" countable or uncountable??


It seems to follow the rules of an uncoutnable noun up to a certain point.

COMPARED with murder for example.

 

article:"HE COMMITTED A MURDER" compared to no article:"HE COMMITED MANSLAUGHTER"

 

BUT  WITH THE MANY/MUCH RULES I AM DOUBTING !!

"There were many murders this year in the USA"         compared to

"There was much manslaughter this year in the USA"
???????

I know more natually we would use, there was a lot  OR, we would use a phrase to make it countable e.g there were a lot of cases of manslaughter. 
 

But can some one, brighter than I, guide me on this one! I'm preparting for a trial class tomorrow for a new job!! Thanks!

asked Jul 12 '13 at 04:10 JOANNA New member

1 answer


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This is a good question, Joanna. I checked the definition in several online dictionaries, and none of them gave a plural form. I can't remember hearing it used as a plural, either.  I would consider it an uncountable noun. Normal use would be 'cases of manslaughter'.

link comment answered Jul 12 '13 at 10:52 Lewis Neidhardt Grammarly Fellow

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