Pronouns

0

I am having a hard time finding 20 pronoun errors on this article. I have found 17.

Thanks for your help.

srjjn@yahoo.com

See example:

The Mixing of Cultures

Because the United States is the melting pot of the world, it draws thousands of immigrants from Europe, Asia, and Africa. Many of these immigrants come to the United States because they want to become Americans. At the same time, they also want to preserve parts of their original cultures. The conflict confuses many immigrants. Some immigrants think that in order to become American, you have to give up your ethnic identity. Others think that becoming an American is possible without losing your ethnic identity. To me, this is the strength of the United States: Filipino Americans are able to be both Filipino and American. I know of no other country in the world where this is true. Many Filipino Americans try to maintain his or her Filipino culture in the United States. For example, they decorate his or her houses to remind them of traditional houses in the Philippines. Filipinos also try to preserve their native language. Although every Filipino speaks English, they also speak Tagalog - usually at home. On holidays, Filipinos observe the traditions of the Philippines. They sing Filipino folk songs, do traditional dances, and cook Filipino foods. Everyone tries to visit their relatives in the Philippines as often as they can. In this way, a Filipino child can often experience their ethnic culture firsthand. My father left the Philippines because of the political persecution he experienced. He was a teacher, and government officials did not think that a teacher should express his opinion if it did not agree with theirs. Unfortunately, the officials did not like some ideas expressed by he and his teaching colleagues. One day, his brother, whom worked for the police, warned him that he would be arrested if he continued to express it. The next day, my father and mother bought plane tickets to the United States for theirselves. Today, he often talks about his life in the Philippines. He describes his village and him as a boy growing up on his father's coffee plantation. He says that he cannot explain how beautiful it was. As he talks, he gets a faraway look in his eyes. I know that he loves his home and that he misses it. However, when I ask if him and Mother would ever want to move back, he says that the United States is his or her home now. A Filipino family that wants to hold on to their ethnic background can learn to live in America. Here, cultures mix and enrich one another. Each culture has something to offer America - their food, language, and traditions. At the same time, America has something to offer each culture - economic opportunity, education, and freedom.

edited Jul 08 '13 at 19:07 Sherrie New member

Sorry I thought it showed up.

SherrieJul 08 '13 at 19:09

Try the "find" feature in your browser or word processor. Type in a pronoun, and it will find all of them. There are a limited number of pronouns, so that is probably the easiest way.

Patty TJul 08 '13 at 23:59

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3 answers


1

Because the United States is the melting pot of the world, it draws thousands of immigrants from Europe, Asia, and Africa. Many of these immigrants come to the United States because they want to become Americans. At the same time, they also want to preserve parts of their original cultures. The conflict confuses many immigrants. Some immigrants think that in order to become American, you (they) have to give up your ethnic identity. Others think that becoming an American is possible without losing your ethnic identity. To me, this is the strength of the United States: Filipino Americans are able to be both Filipino and American. I know of no other country in the world where this is true. Many Filipino Americans try to maintain his or her (theirFilipino culture in the United States. For example, they decorate his or her houses to remind them of traditional houses in the Philippines. Filipinos also try to preserve their native language. Although every Filipino speaks English, they (he or she)also speaks Tagalog - usually at home. On holidays, Filipinos observe the traditions of the Philippines. They sing Filipino folk songs, do traditional dances, and cook Filipino foods. Everyone tries to visit their relatives in the Philippines as often as they can. In this way, a Filipino child can often experience their ethnic culture firsthand. My father left the Philippines because of the political persecution he experienced. He was a teacher, and government officials did not think that a teacher should express his (or her) opinion if it did not agree with theirs. Unfortunately, the officials did not like some ideas expressed by he (him) and his teaching colleagues. One day, his brother, whom (who) worked for the police, warned him that he would be arrested if he continued to express it. The next day, my father and mother bought plane tickets to the United States for theirselves. Today, he often talks about his life in the Philippines. He describes his village and him as a boy (his growing up...) growing up on his father's coffee plantation. He says that he cannot explain how beautiful it was. As he talks, he gets a faraway look in his eyes. I know that he loves his home and that he misses it. However, when I ask if him (he) and Mother would ever want to move back, he says that the United States is his or her (their, his, or our) home now. A Filipino family that wants to hold on to their ethnic background can learn to live in America. Here, cultures mix and enrich one another. Each culture has something to offer America - their food, language, and traditions. At the same time, America has something to offer each culture - economic opportunity, education, and freedom.
 

Sherrie,

I did not count the wrong pronouns, but I have put them all in bold and italic font. Most of the mistakes have to do with what we call "Pronoun-antecedent agreement." The main point here is that the pronoun should agree with the word it replaces (the antecedent). If you replace the word "child" with a pronoun, you should use "he or she" ("him or her" depending on the case) as the child could be either a boy or a girl; the same applies to the singular indefinite pronouns ending in "-body," "-one," and "-thing." (Everobody  wants to have his or her happiness.) If the antecedent is plural (for example, "immigrants"), then you should use plural pronouns -- they, them, their, themselves...

There is, of course, a lot more to this issue, but you'll need to consult a grammar book for further details.

I hope this was helpful.

link comment answered Jul 09 '13 at 00:54 Elin Tomov Contributor
1

Besides the common kinds of pronoun errors that Elin explained, another kind of pronoun error is one of changing pronouns unnecessarily, for example, shifting from third person pronouns ("they," "their") to second person ("you," "your") or first person ("I," "me").  Often when we speak, we shift from "you" to "they" to refer to people in general; however, in written or more formal communication, we should take special care not to do that. 

 

To find more errors in the passage you're analyzing, look for instances of "you" and "your" to see if they should really be "they" and "their."  Also determine if the instances of "I" really need to be there or if they're extraneous.

link comment answered Jul 09 '13 at 02:12 Dr. G Contributor
-1

If you can find 17 pronoun errors in a four word phrase containing no pronouns, I don't think I can help you.

link answered Jul 08 '13 at 18:00 Lewis Neidhardt Grammarly Fellow

Sorry, I thought the article showed up.

SherrieJul 08 '13 at 19:20

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