Would rather you go to the store or went to the store

1

I have a remained question about those structures. Do they have an exactly same meaning? 

When do you use ''would rather someone present tense and would someone past tense? Please answer my question! 

 

Thank you very much!

DD

edited Jun 25 '13 at 15:58 ducdang123 Contributor

2 answers


4

Ducdang, please ignore Holly's answer.  She didn't read your question very carefully and has given you an unhelpful answer.

 

The correct verb tense after subject + would rather + object is simple past tense, but it has a present or future meaning.  It means that the person who is the subject would prefer that the person who is the object do something.

 

I'd rather you went home now. (not you go home

I am busy tomorrow.  I'd rather you came next weekend.  (not you come)

 

You can use a variation of this structure to talk about past events: subject + would rather + object + Past Perfect:

 

I'd rather you hadn't done that.  

 

But this form, while grammatical, is quite uncommon.  I wish you hadn't done that is more common.

 

I hope this helps.

link edited Jun 26 '13 at 04:50 Shawn Mooney Expert

He edited his question between my answer and your answer.

Actually HollyJun 26 '13 at 13:39

Sorry, Holly - I had no way of knowing...

Shawn MooneyJun 26 '13 at 15:50

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3

"Would you went to the store?" is incorrect.

 

"Would you go to the store?" can mean two things. More commonly, it's a way of asking someone to go to the store. ("Would you go to the store for me, please?") It can also be a way to ask someone if they're likely to go to the store. ("Would you go to the store if it were raining out?")

 

If you want to ask someone if they were likely to go to the store in the past, you could ask, "Would you have gone to the store?"

link answered Jun 25 '13 at 15:35 Actually Holly Expert

I inevitably mislead the question that it should be would rather you go to the store or went to the store.

ducdang123Jun 25 '13 at 15:58

misled

ducdang123Jun 25 '13 at 15:59

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