Punctuation

1

What is wrong with the following question?

 

I need to visit my friend, to wash my bike, and buy six stamps.

 

Does it require any change in punctuation? 

2 answers


-4

I think that the sentence should be'I need to visit my friend to wash my bike and buy six stamps.'

Even if you had to use commas in this sentence, it could have been like this:I need to visit my friend,wash my bike and buy six stamps.

There is no need of using commas in this sentence. We use a comma for different purposes. 

1.To separate the elements when they are in a series.(For example:She is beautiful, efficient in her work and honest.)

2.To connect two independent phrases.(For example:He is poor,but he is happy.)

There are many more uses of 'comma'. You might as well visit this site for more details:www.wikihow.com

 

I hope this helps.

link edited Jun 24 '13 at 15:37 Scarlet Darwin Contributor

but doesn't the omission of commas distort meaning.I want the sentence to mean that i have three different things to do(visit my friend)|(wash my bike)|(buy six stamps)

jasvir singhJun 24 '13 at 15:41

"I need to visit my friend,wash my bike and buy six stamps." This sentence means exactly what you want it to. It has a series of actions (visit my friend)|(wash my bike)|(buy six stamps).So the omission of commas won't change the meaning.

Scarlet DarwinJun 24 '13 at 15:49

Just to be clear, if we don't use commas, the sentence would mean that i have go to my friend to do the other 2 things(wash bike and buy stamps).

Sorry to disturb you repeatedly, i have a test tomorrow.

jasvir singhJun 24 '13 at 16:01

yeah exactly. And moreover please don't be sorry. I too have my literature exam tomorrow but you see I am so much addicted to Grammarly that I am still online. Best of luck for you test....:)

Scarlet DarwinJun 24 '13 at 16:05

sorry..it should be 'your test'. Just a slip of fingers.

Scarlet DarwinJun 24 '13 at 16:16

may I please know what is wrong with my answer?

Scarlet DarwinJun 24 '13 at 16:17

Thanks, that's very kind of you. You are right; this website is very helpful. Good luck for your exam too. :)

jasvir singhJun 24 '13 at 16:17

Thanks, that's very kind of you. You are right; this website is very helpful. Good luck for your exam too. :)

jasvir singhJun 24 '13 at 16:17

any time Jasvir......

Scarlet DarwinJun 24 '13 at 16:18

which answer you mean?

jasvir singhJun 24 '13 at 16:24

the answer to your thanking me.

Scarlet DarwinJun 25 '13 at 14:13

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3

In terms of punctuation,  most people do not like a comma before and so would find the first one enough.  But those who like the "Oxford Comma" would have all three, as in your example.

 

Another point is that the second to is superfluous.

 

Good luck with the test!

link answered Jun 24 '13 at 16:25 Michael Cranfield Expert

but my text book encourages the use of the "Oxford Comma" .When you say that second "to" is superfluous, u advise that i must omit it in the sentence to make it right? Or it's optional?

jasvir singhJun 24 '13 at 16:36

The Oxford comma is a style choice and is optional (as long as you pick one style and remain consistent) -- but if your text book and professor want it, then you should probably use it for now :)

Actually HollyJun 24 '13 at 21:44

Thanks for the reply, but i wanted to be more clear about that 2nd "to". Should i omit that always?

jasvir singhJun 25 '13 at 08:13

Yes, delete the second "to" in your sentence.

Patty TJun 26 '13 at 04:25

Thank you, Patty - I have been otherwise engaged for the last two days.

Michael CranfieldJun 26 '13 at 19:58

And well said Holly!

Michael CranfieldJun 26 '13 at 20:01

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