Some reviewers ask to put commas after each desciption. Grammarly states otherwise.

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In some underserved, community-based, ECE settings there are limited opportunities to participate in ongoing professional learning (Walker, 2009).

See example:

In some underserved, community-based, ECE settings there are limited opportunities to participate in ongoing professional learning .
asked Jun 13 '13 at 19:49 Pamela J. Bates New member

4 answers


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Maybe this will work for you. I disagree with your reviewers.

 

There are limited opportunities to participate in ongoing professional learning in some underserved, community-based, ECE settings.

 

This gives your reviewers their comma, but also gives the reader a break. Note: Do not fail a course, test or work project because someguy on the internet told you to leave out a comma or two. If by “your reviewers” you mean bosses – give them all the commas they want ;<)  

link comment edited Jun 14 '13 at 02:55 Brother Dave Contributor
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To me I believe in always separating nouns or adjectives in a list with a comma unless they go together, for example, I had an apple, ice cream, and peanut butter and jelly for lunch. It wouldn't make sense to separate peanut butter and jelly with a comma. In your example with the adjective "community-based" I don't think there should be a comma after it because it seems to go with "ECE" which seems to go with "settings". When in doubt I always use the rule that if you pause when you read something out loud, you probably need a comma. If not, you probably don't.

link comment answered Jun 13 '13 at 20:15 Star New member
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I forgot to mention I wouldn't put a comma after "ECE" either.

link comment answered Jun 13 '13 at 20:16 Star New member
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Star provides excellent advice for the use of commas in a list. The Chicago Manual of Style calls this (and the exception Star cites) a Serial Comma. Others call it the Oxford Comma.

 

But the issue Pamela raises is not a serial list. Rather, her question involves coordinate adjectives -- "two or more adjectives preceding a noun" (see CMoS at 6.33). In this case, commas are needed to separate two or more adjectives that could, without changing or losing meaning, be joined with "and". In most cases, coordinate adjectives can be reversed in order without changing the meaning. If "and" cannot be inserted between the adjectives, then no comma should be insert4\ed.

 

The sample sentence has three adjectives before the noun "setting" -- underserved, community-based, and ECE. While I don't know the context (or the author's intent), I suspect a comma is needed between underserved and community-based (can they be reversed and still convey the same meaning?) but not between community-based and ECE (these cannot be reversed).

 

I hope this helps. 

link comment edited Jun 15 '13 at 04:07 Jeff Pribyl Grammarly Fellow

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