One deer, two deer, a herd of deer. One beer, two beer, a case of beer.

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Is  beer  plural  for beer  if deer is plural for deer?

asked Jun 08 '13 at 02:07 Taverna New member

6 answers


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No. Unfortunately the English language has many variations and irregularities, including its plurals. Two beers. Two deer.

 

Also, two cheers, two leers, and two veneers.

 

Deer is the oddity.

link comment answered Jun 08 '13 at 02:13 Maxine Lebola New member
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"Deer" is the same in singular and plural. "Beer," as a type of drink, is always singular (e.g. "The beer they brew is the best." "There is some beer left in that keg."). However, when we say "beer" and mean "a bottle/can of beer," then this noun takes the normal plural form: 1 beer, 3 beers, 5 beers (I guess that's my limit :).

link comment answered Jun 08 '13 at 02:13 Elin Tomov Contributor
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Deer is an exception for plural in English language, but to understand beer, it is a type of drink just like wine or Pepsi, contained in an object, say bottle or glass. So when using the plural form, we can say two beer because the plural form is actually used for the container, say two pints of beer or three bottles of Coke.

link answered Jun 08 '13 at 05:25 Anūp Chakravartī New member

I agree

TavernaJun 13 '13 at 19:39

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As an English speaker, we would never say two beer. It would always be two beers, the container or type would be assumed, or already known.

link comment answered Jun 08 '13 at 06:31 Pamela Ford New member
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It should be said two beerS.

link comment answered Jun 08 '13 at 09:04 Danilo New member
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The typical rule is to add an "s" to most nouns to make them plural; as noted above, "deer" is the exception to the rule, which has nothing to do with the spelling of the word.

 

Unfortunately, this is just one of those parts of language-learning that we simply have to memorize. Similarly, here are a few other singular-to-plural exceptions:

 

One mouse; two mice

One moose; two moose

One goose; two geese

One hoof; two hooves

One tooth; two teeth

One man; two men

link comment answered Jun 10 '13 at 19:08 Katie New member

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