the usage of welcome as opposed to welcomed.


which sentence is correct in the use of welcome or welcomed?

Thank you john and you are most welcomed. OR..... Thank you John and you are most welcome.

See example:

You are most welcomed.
asked May 03 '13 at 18:37 Walshin Investigations New member

2 answers


In this context, 'welcome' is an adjective. It can also be used as a noun, verb, or an exclamation. The only time it would have the '-ed' ending is when it is a verb.


 You are most welcome.



We received a warm welcome.



We welcomed the guests into the house.



Welcome! Please come in.

link comment answered May 03 '13 at 19:08 Lewis Neidhardt Grammarly Fellow

 "You are welcomed" is correct because this is how the PASSIVE voice is used in the English Language.

Examples of ACTIVE VOICE:
This bores you. (or: I bore you.)
I accept you.
I love you.
I trust you.
I excite you.
I welcome you.

You are bored. (not "You are bore")
You are accepted. (not "You are accept")
You are loved. (not "You are love")
You are trusted. (not "You are trust")
You are excited. (not "You are excite")
You are welcomed. (not "You are welcome")

Always remember the distinction between ACTIVE VOICE and PASSIVE VOICE: I welcome you, and you are welcomed (by me)

The words: bored, accepted, trusted, loved, welcomed are also examples of participial adjectives and their roles as adjectives can also be understood in the following examples.

Used as an adjective, we would have:
The bored guest.
The accepted guest
The loved guest (or the beloved guest)
The excited guest
The welcomed guest.

Unfortunately we hear it so often wrongly expressed as "You are welcome ..." that we have grown used to the error and now find it universally accepted, even though it is an incorrect usage of the Passive Voice. (and by the way, the -d ending in these cases are not an expression of past tense at all.)

You may wish to explore more about "the passive voice" in English


link comment answered Nov 05 at 00:24 k8 New member

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