Grammar usage (flagged)

0

How do you distinguish between a gerund and a present participial in a sentence?  I would appreciate if you could give me examples.

asked Mar 23 '13 at 08:39 Sanjay Expert

2 answers


1

It can be tricky at times.  A gerund is a verbal that ends in -ing and functions as a noun. The term verbal indicates that a gerund, like the other two kinds of verbals, is based on a verb and therefore expresses action or a state of being. However, since a gerund functions as a noun, it occupies some positions in a sentence that a noun ordinarily would, for example: subject, direct object, subject complement, and object of preposition.

 

A participle is a verbal that is used as an adjective and most often ends in -ing or -ed. The term verbal indicates that a participle, like the other two kinds of verbals, is based on a verb and therefore expresses action or a state of being. However, since they function as adjectives, participles modify nouns or pronouns. There are two types of participles: present participles and past participles. Present participles end in -ing. Past participles end in -ed, -en, -d, -t, -n, or -ne as in the words asked, eaten, saved, dealt, seen, and gone.

link comment answered Mar 23 '13 at 10:02 Lewis Neidhardt Grammarly Fellow
1

If the -ing word modifies a noun, it's a participle.

The running man

A walking dog

 

If there is a possessive in front of the -ing word, it's a gerund.

The dog's barking became a nuisance.

His walking became a daily habit.

 

This would be incorrect. Walking is the daily habit, not him.

Him walking became a daily habit.

link comment answered Mar 23 '13 at 18:37 Lewis Neidhardt Grammarly Fellow

Your answer


Write at least 20 characters

Have a question about English grammar, style or vocabulary use? Ask now to get help from Grammarly experts for FREE.