Grammar usage (flagged)

1

There are several meanings for the word "just". One meaning is "now"

Can I use just and now together in a sentence?

asked Mar 01 '13 at 10:22 Sanjay Expert

1 answer


1

Sanjay,

 

As usual, you have asked an excellent question!

 

The short answer to your question is, yes, sometimes you can use just together with now. 

 

When just has a time-based meaning, the adverb can mean either (1) at this moment/right now or (2) a time very close to the present.  Meaning #1 is usually used with a Present Continuous verb, and #2 with (more natural in American English) a Simple Past verb or (more natural in British and Canadian English) a Present Perfect verb.  Using just now instead of just is possible for both meanings, but is more common for #2, and the phrase often appears in a different place in the sentence.

 

Example sentences for Meaning #1

 

I'll be down in a minute.  I'm just changing my shirt.

I'll be down in a minute.  Just now, I'm changing my shirt. [not as natural with just now]

I'll be down in a minute.  I'm changing my shirt just now. [not as natural with just now]

 

Example sentences for Meaning #2

 

Mr. Smith has just phoned.

Mr. Smith just phoned.

Mr. Smith has phoned just now.

Mr. Smith phoned just now.

Just now, Mr. Smith has phoned. [not quite as natural as the other versions]

Just now, Mr. Smith phoned. [not quite as natural as the other versions]

 

I hope this helps.

link comment edited Mar 01 '13 at 12:39 Shawn Mooney Expert

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