to doing something (not in continuous present tense)

0

In school, I learnt three forms of verb:

 

1. The base form, to + Verb-infinitive

Example:I can do it

 

2. Verb1 + Verb2-ING

I need finding the answer

 

3. Verb1 + TO + Verb2-infinitive

I got to go home now.

 

However, sometimes I see people use

Verb1 + TO + Verb2-ING

 

So, Is there any rule for it?

What is it good for? (emphasize any idea, or any expression)

 

Please distinguish this case and case number 3 (or 2) I've written.

 

Thanks so much.

asked Jun 17 '11 at 06:43 kay New member

2 answers


1

Generally English verbs have three forms: base form, past form, past participle form

 

Others count in the present participle and modal auxiliaries as well (see here for more)

 

Your examples above are not correct English ("I need finding the answer" "I got to go home")

 

"Verb1 + TO + Verb2-ing" - an example here that I can think of is "I look forward to seeing you at the conference"

 

 

link comment answered Jun 18 '11 at 20:09 Gabedude Contributor
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I've been struggling to explain this to my student also.

Your #2 example should be "I need to find an answer." or "I am finding the answer."  I think the main verb ("need", "am, is, are") determines whether we use the infinitive (to find) or the participle (finding).  Maybe an English teacher can help all of us with an explanation of this - I am still trying to find one. (Is it a case of transitive/intransitive verbs?)  Another way we could construct this sentence would be to use the participle as an adjective, "I need help finding an answer." - here "finding" is used as an adjective modifying "help", if I understand this correctly.

#3 should be "I have to go home." - "got" is not correct English although it is often used by teenagers.  We would also say "I am going home now," or "I must go home now."

link comment answered Mar 17 '12 at 19:29 Joan Quenan New member

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