Can you explain that better?

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I've seen the following in my grammar. It was in a weather vocabulary section.

Can you explain that better? I think that two sentences showing how to use both versions would already help!
 

 

"(North American English) pour (down)/(British English) pour (down) with rain"

edited Jun 14 '11 at 22:31 coraliecinq New member

1 answer


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NOTE: In English, we use 'it' to refer generically to the weather.

 

In North America, if it is raining very hard, we say that it is pouring down.  We can also say that it is simply 'pouring'.  Here are some of the most common uses:

 

"Wow! It's pouring outside!"

 

"You shouldn't walk home now; it's pouring down rain outside!"

 

Alternatively, in NA, we often say 'coming down'.

 

"Geez! It's really coming down outside!"

 

In British English, my understanding is that they use the same constructions, but include the preposition 'with'.  Here are the equivalent constructions in BrE:

 

"Wow! It's pouring outside!"

 

"You shouldn't walk home now; it's pouring down with rain!"

 

 A native BrE speaker may need to confirm this.

 

NOTE: In NA, we sometimes add the 'with' to add emphasis.

 

I hope this helps!

 

Kim

link comment edited Jun 16 '11 at 11:50 Kimberly Expert

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