A capital letter for 'for example'

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1) Is there a meaning difference between 'would' and 'would like to'? For example, I would go and I would like to go.

 

2) Is there a meaning difference between 'would' and 'would like to', for example, I would go and I would like to go?

 

Which one is natural to you? I think that having two independent sentences is a better choice and do you agree that would also means 'would like to and wish to' sometimes?

 

Thank you so much as usual and I am sorry about asking too many questions today.  

asked Jan 19 '13 at 15:47 Hans Contributor

2 answers


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Both are natural, and both are correct. But they mean different things.

 

"I would go [but my mother won't let me]" means "I will go if my mother says it's okay."

"I would like to go" means "I wish I could go."

 

I hope this helps.

link comment answered Jan 19 '13 at 16:45 Jeff Pribyl Grammarly Fellow
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I would like to go does not mean I wish I could go unless followed by some reason that makes going impossible, for example I would like to go, but I have to work

 

I would like to go is simply a polite, formal way to say I want to go.  There is no inherent sense of 'not being able to go' in the expression.

 

I wish I could go always means that I want to go, but cannot for some reason.

 

I wish to go has the same meaning as I would like to go, but is very very formal. 

 

I would go followed by a reason for not being able to go, and interpreted in the same context as the other expressions, means almost the same as I wish I could go but the 'wanting to' or 'wishing to' nuance is much less emphasized.  I would go to the party, but I have to work, or I would go to the party if I didn't have to work. In these sentences, we know that I can't go because of work, and that if I didn't have to work I would go.  We don't necessarily know that I want to go, or at least my desire to go doesn't come through as strongly with this expression. 

 

I don't agree with Jeff when he equates I would go but my mother won't let me to I will go if my mother says it's okay.  The first sentence explains why I can't go; the second sentence explains what condition needs to be fulfilled (my mother giving her consent) in order for me to go.  There is no hope of me being able to go in the first sentence, but still some hope, hinging on my mother, in the second.

 

I would go as a three-word sentence could have many other meanings in other contexts.

 

I hope this helps.

link comment edited Jan 20 '13 at 06:34 Shawn Mooney Expert

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