Another question involving "and" between two independent clauses.

0

What about this sentence?

 

In addition to the swords, Amy was given a bow with a full quiver of arrows and the boys each received a dagger.

 

 Since both clauses seem to be describing what the two subjects were given in addition to swords, it would seem like there is no need for a comma before and? Or am I wrong again?

 

What about a I. C. + Conjuction + I. C. sentence that starts with suddenly (or something like it)? For example:

 

Suddenly the door of the chariot was swung open and a tall, fair-haired woman stood in the doorway. 

 

Thanks!

asked Jan 08 '13 at 19:07 Kyle Josiah Bowes New member

1 answer


2

 In addition to the swords, Amy was given a bow with a full quiver of arrows, and the boys each received a dagger.

 

Q. Since both clauses seem to be describing what the two subjects were given in addition to swords, it would seem like there is no need for a comma before and? Or am I wrong again?

A. Yes, you are wrong. 'Amy' is the subject of the first IC, and 'boys' is the subject of the second. Whenever the clauses are independent, a comma and a conjunction (or a semicolon and no conjunction) is necessary. The way the sentence reads, only Amy received swords, or it is ambiguous if the boys got swords.

 

What about a I. C. + Conjuction + I. C. sentence that starts with suddenly (or something like it)? For example:

 

Suddenly, the door of the chariot was swung open, and a tall, fair-haired woman stood in the doorway.

You need  comma after suddenly, and, once again, you have two independent clauses with separate subjects and verbs, 'door was swung' and 'woman stood'.

 

The rule of IC +comma+conjunction+IC is a hard and fast rule. If you leave out the comma, you have a run on sentence. If you have the comma and no conjunction, you have a comma splice.

link comment edited Jan 08 '13 at 19:26 Lewis Neidhardt Grammarly Fellow

Your answer


Write at least 20 characters

Have a question about English grammar, style or vocabulary use? Ask now to get help from Grammarly experts for FREE.